The work of ten students of the MSc Advanced Architectural Studies course produced for the Architectural Phenomena module in the academic year 2012-2013 has recently been exhibited as part of the MSc AAS 40th birthday celebration. The Visual Arguments poster exhibition concluded the second day of celebrations of the alumni social event, with prizes awarded to the three winning student posters.

Architectural Phenomena is a module offered during the second term of the MSc Advanced Architectural Studies course (currently renamed to MSc Spatial Design: Architecture and Cities). The underlying basis of the module is the recognition that architecture arranges spatial, formal and social relationships and is imbued with theoretical ideas, intelligibility and meaning. Architectural Phenomena explores ideas involved in texts, buildings and architectural designs through the themes of space, form, function, cognition, perception, design creativity and cultural meaning. The course is structured through seminars and lectures introducing students to a selected body of canonical and contemporary texts, foundational and advanced ideas in architectural theory, social theory and space syntax. Students are encouraged to explore these issues through in-depth theoretical reflection built around class conversations, critical writing and analytical drawing.

As part of the course assignments, one task that students were called to respond to was the composition of a visual-verbal argument in the form of a poster. Developing and presenting ideas verbally and visually is an essential component in academic and professional practice. The students have interrogated selected theoretical texts to produce critical readings that try to add new layers of understanding and interpretation through a creative synthesis of images and ideas. The effect is to show how inexhaustive are the opportunities for reinterpretation and critical reflection contained in architectural theory and its possibilities for interaction with space syntax.

Posters were considered in relation to visual and textual criteria and the integration of both, as well as in terms of the originality, execution and interpretation of the visual argument.

1st winning prize: ‘Reorganization of Public Space in Second Empire Paris’, by Tania Oramas-Dorta. Interpretation of the text The Political Economy of Public Space, David Harvey, 2005.

 

2nd winning prize: ‘Representation or Embodied Experience’, by Ida Feltendal. On The Naked City, Situationist International, Guy Debord, and Asger Jorn, 1967.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd winning prize: ‘On the Effect of Panopticism to the Public Space’, by Wente Pan. On Discipline and Punish, Michel Foucault, 1979.